Child Custody and Child Support Part 1 – How to Get It Right the First Time

Child Custody and Child Support Part 1 – How to Get It Right the First Time

Posted on August 3rd, 2018

For many people, there is no outcome in a divorce more important than maintaining the ability to nurture a healthy relationship to your children. For that reason, achieving a fair and beneficial child custody and child support order during your initial divorce proceedings is crucial.

In the first part of the Child Custody and Child Support series, important factors to consider when creating the original agreement to ensure a lasting and satisfactory solution:

  1. Interact with your spouse as respectfully as possible at all times. If you both can be respectful and cooperative, it will make forming your initial agreement, carrying out the agreement, and making any future modifications to the agreement a smoother process. Nevada law joint legal and joint physical custody unless the court specifically addresses that the best interests of the child are not served by joint legal or joint physical custody and child arrangements are a long-term commitment, so the better you and your spouse can work together, the easier it will be for you and your children in the years to come.
  2. Consider your work schedule and other commitments realistically. Custody is a long-term arrangement, so it’s unwise to request responsibilities out of fear or insecurity. Instead, consider the facts as coldly as you can.
  3. Think through the needs of each of your children and the resources of each parent. How will your children’s ages and personalities impact the type of agreement you want? What will your family schedule look like? What academic or extracurricular activities are your children committed to? How will your childcare arrangements work given the distance between the parents’ homes? What are the differences in career obligations and social tendencies of each parent?
  4. Voice all issues that concern you during the initial court proceedings. In Nevada, parents cannot seek a custody change simply because they want one. Down the road, the court will not allow you to raise old, pre-existing issues in consideration of custody. The court will only allow new changes in circumstance to be considered, because they want the children’s lives to be as stable and predictable as possible. If something is bothering you, speak up now. Don’t wait until it’s too late to factor it into the court’s decision. If you are unsure about something, ask your lawyer for their advice. When it comes to child custody and support issues, there is no substitute for experience in family law.

Achieving a fair and beneficial child custody and child support agreement is crucial for all parties involved. Considering these factors is key to ensuring the original agreement is lasting and manageable.